Since version 9, Java has new features every 6 months and it’s very hard to keep track of these new changes. Most of the information on the internet describes changes between the last 2 Java versions. However, if you’re in a similar situation as me, you’re not using the last Java version but a version several releases older.

Then it’s useful to know which new features were added since the version you use now, or between the versions that you use now and the one you want to start using next. Therefore I’ve compiled a table with all new features added since Java 8 for each new Java version.

(more…)

EclipseCon conference is a great event for all Java developers, especially those who are passionate about and believe in opensource. The conference is scheduled for 26-28 October 2021. I wholeheartedly recommend to attend it. It’s a free online event, you just need to register to attend: https://www.eclipsecon.org/2021

Specifically for users of Jakarta EE it might be even more interesting to attend the Jakarta EE Community Day, which happens the day before the main conference on 25 October 2021. It’s open to all people that register for the main EclipseCon event. There’s a packed agenda centered on the Jakarta EE, MicroProfile and Cloud Native Java communities, including topics like the present and future of MicroProfile and Jakarta EE, and upcoming features in Jakarta Security, Jakarta Concurrency, Jakarta REST, and Jakarta NoSQL.

If you’re interested, I recommend reading an article of Reza Rahman about what’s happening at the Community Day and why to attend it. Or simply go ahead and register for EclipseCon 2021!

Recently, we had a discussion how to create a standalone Jakarta Batch test kit (TCK). For most of the committers, it’s pretty natural to use Arquillian to abstracts tests away from how they are executed on an implementation. But Romain proposed an intriguing idea to use plain JUnit5 that got me thinking. And it didn’t stop with thinking. After a few hours of hacking, I’m now able to present a proof of concept and suggest how we could use plain JUnit5 for the TCK and also how containers can be integrated with it using good old Arquillian to avoid reinventing the wheel.

(more…)
This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Java EE 8 Microservices

Services can often be optimized with asynchronous processing even without changing their behavior towards the outside world. The reason why some services aren’t efficient is that they need to wait for other services to provide a result to continue further. Let’s look how to call external REST services without waiting for them and also do multiple parallel calls independently and combine their results later with a reactive pipeline in Java EE 8.

(more…)

Answering Stackoverflow questions provides a great feedback for finding out gaps in the official documentation of my favourite opensource tools. One of the questions which I answered here was how to change Payara Server master password in docker container. Obviously, in a standard server installation, this is simple – just use the asadmin change-master-password  command, then type the old and new password in to the console and it’s done. Not in docker though, where the configuration has to be automated by a script. The same applies to all infrastructure-as-a-code solutions like Chef or Puppet. So I had to dig deeper into the documentation and experiment a bit. (more…)

As a Java EE developer, I sometimes envy how fast it’s possible to see the result of a code change in a running application with interpreted languages like PHP or JavaScript. With Java, it’s always necessary to rebuild the source code in a bytecode, which can be then safely updated only by restarting the whole application. And all developers know that restoring the desired state of the application after a fresh restart takes time and is tedious. A while ago I’ve come across an opensource tool called HotswapAgent that speeds up code reloading. (more…)

Last week, Oracle announced their intentions to open Java EE and transfer it to an open source foundation to continue its development in a more open way. I’ve been involved in some email discussions (here and here) and in a conference call organized by Oracle and I want to summarize what I know and expect in the future. I’m also a MicroProfile project member, so I’ll comment on its relation and future benefits to Java EE. (more…)

As a public presenter, I always wonder what kind of presentation should I submit for tech conferences. Knowing what people want to hear about is always important to submit a good talk, and to give a good presentation once the talk is accepted by the conference. Here are some insights which I’ve collected from public feedback on conferences in 2016, and also a summary of my impressions and most common topics I’ve seen. (more…)

A singleton pattern is probably the simplest well-known design pattern, but still people often implement it incorrectly in Java. (more…)

Well, not yet…but they announced to shutdown java.net and kenai by May 2017. I have been interviewed about this for an ADTmag article The ‘Sunsetting’ of Kenai and java.net

As Oracle provided little information to what will happen to critical projects that are already hosted on java.net, most of what was written in the article is still valid. Therefore I’m reposting my comments here again.

(more…)

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. By using this site you agree to these cookies being set. More in our cookies policy

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close